Document Records - Vintage Blues and Jazz

Yonder Come The Blues

7.49   
 

FEATURED ARTIST / S
Mamprusi Tribesmen
Ladzekpo and Ewe Drum Orchestra
Othar Turner
Kunaal and Sosira
Butch Cage and Willie Thomas
Thyam Sy Griots
Lonnie Coleman
Charlie Poole with the North Carolina Ramblers
Lil McClintock
Tom Darby and Jimmie Tarlton
Too Tight Henry
Georgia Browns
Prairie Ramblers
Hokum Boys
Bob Wills and his Texas Playboys
Bertha 'Chippie' Hill
Blind Lemon Jefferson
Whistlin Alex Moore
Rev. J M Gates
Blind Willie Johnson
Robert Wilkins
Big Bill Broonzy
Lil Johnson
Pinetop Burks

    TRACK LIST

Ladzekpo and Ewe Drum Orchestra
01 - Agbekor Listen

Mamprusi Tribesmen
02 - Ring dance Listen

Othar Turner
03 - Fife and drum piece Listen

Kunaal and Sosira
04 - Praise song Listen

Butch Cage and Willie Thomas
05 - Forty four blues Listen

Thyam Sy Griots
06 - Halam improvisation Listen

Lonnie Coleman
07 - Wild about my loving Listen

Charlie Poole with the North Carolina Ramblers
08 - Coon from Tennessee Listen

Lil McClintock
09 - Don't think I'm Santa Claus Listen

Tom Darby and Jimmie Tarlton
10 - Sweet Sara blues Listen

Too Tight Henry
11 - Charleston contest - Part 2 Listen

Georgia Browns
12 - Decatur Street 81 Listen

Prairie Ramblers
13 - Jug rag Listen

Hokum Boys
14 - Caught us doing it Listen

Bob Wills and his Texas Playboys
15 - Brain cloudy blues Listen

Bertha 'Chippie' Hill
16 - Kid man blues Listen

Blind Lemon Jefferson
17 - Rabbit foot blues Listen

Whistlin Alex Moore
18 - Blue bloomer blues Listen

Rev. J M Gates
19 - Death's black train is comin' Listen

Blind Willie Johnson
20 - When the war was on Listen

Robert Wilkins
21 - New stock yard blues Listen

Big Bill Broonzy
22 - Detroit special Listen

Lil Johnson
23 - Press my button (Ring my bell) Listen

Pinetop Burks
24 - Fannie Mae blues Listen

Various.
Informative booklet notes by Paul Oliver.
Detailed discography.

This CD covers three areas covered by Paul Oliver's book Yonder Come The Blues; Savannah Syncopators; With African musical retentions in the United States, the meeting of White and Black traditions, and the development of sound recording, we witness the evolution of a genre. one would argue that the spirituals, gospel songs, work songs, jazz and blues which have flourished during the past century are American music forms, and most authorities would contend that they owe their existence to the presence of the black population. All these types of music have been influenced to some extent by white traditions of European origin but it seem generally accepted that the descendants of the slaves who were imported from Africa combined them with elements of musical traditions that they had brought with them.

Blacks, Whites and Blues; Interaction between black and white musicians has been one of the most stimulating forces in American folk music. Nowadays, for social reasons, exchanges are rarer; but in the 'twenties and 'thirties they were frequent and fertile. The aim of this part of the collection is to show something of this cross-fertilisation.

Recording The Blues; Blues recording began by accident. In February 1920 the General Phonograph Corporation in New York happened to record two popular songs by a black woman, Mamie Smith. The demand for these made the record companies aware that there was a black record-buying public eager for material by singers of their own race. Soon every black cabaret and roadshow singer had taken her turn in the studios. Many of their records were numbered in special series that came to be known as 'Race Series' Each label had its established stars in the early 'twenties: there was Ma Rainey at Paramount and the great Bessie Smith at Columbia. But it was OKeh who led the field; of the 250 race records released in 1925 more than a third were in their 8000 series, including such masterpieces as Bertha "Chippie" Hill's Kid Man Blues featuring the young Louis Armstrong on cornet. These were the days of the Classic Blues singers, women whose accompaniment was usually a piano or a small jazz group. Then, early in 1926, Paramount introduced a new type of blues record, by Blind Lemon Jefferson, an itinerant guitar-picker from Texas who sang poignant songs about the style of life he led. Rabbit Foot Blues was one of Lemon's finest numbers, his expressive guitar complementing the slurred vocal as he sang of 'those meatless and wheatless days'.

Home SearchSpecials Services MP3'sArchive News Contact View Cart